1. shitshilarious:


iliveinmattsmithspants:

territorialcreep:

itseasytoremember:

whythefuckareyouromeo:


0ver-doze:

omg they are so offended if you lick them back. 

Fun fact! Dogs lick the mouths of those they consider higher in rank! So if you lick them back, they are not offended, they just don’t see themselves as higher than you and they are confused! The second dog must be a very loyal dog because he or she literally refuses to be licked back haha! I love dogs.

i started reading that expecting an angry rant and it turned out to be one of the nicest things ever.

I have reblogged this like ten times

My cat grooms me. What does that mean?

It means your cat thinks your style is wack and is trying to help

    shitshilarious:

    iliveinmattsmithspants:

    territorialcreep:

    itseasytoremember:

    whythefuckareyouromeo:


    0ver-doze
    :

    image

    omg they are so offended if you lick them back. 

    Fun fact! Dogs lick the mouths of those they consider higher in rank! So if you lick them back, they are not offended, they just don’t see themselves as higher than you and they are confused! The second dog must be a very loyal dog because he or she literally refuses to be licked back haha! I love dogs.

    i started reading that expecting an angry rant and it turned out to be one of the nicest things ever.

    I have reblogged this like ten times

    My cat grooms me. What does that mean?

    It means your cat thinks your style is wack and is trying to help

    (via flamboyant-bassist)

    6 hours ago  /  844,291 notes  /   /  Source: kingjrific

  2. arpeggia:

Gustav Klimt - Death and Life, 1916

    arpeggia:

    Gustav Klimt - Death and Life, 1916

    (via deceptivecadenza)

    6 hours ago  /  974 notes  /   /  Source: arpeggia

  3. (via monananana111)

    6 hours ago  /  34 notes  /   /  Source: do4do

  4. discordion:

When he was 2 years old, he fell out of a second story window and fractured his skull
When he was 6 years old, he mistakenly drank boric acid.
When he was 9 years old, he fell over a small cliff and broke his leg.
When he was 11 years old, he contracted measles and was in a coma for nine days.
When he was 14 years old, he broke his arm when he caught it in a carriage door.
When he was 19 years old, he was struck on the head by a falling brick.
When he was 23 years old, he almost died from the effects of tainted wine.
When he was 29 years old, Adolph Sax invented the saxophone.

    discordion:

    When he was 2 years old, he fell out of a second story window and fractured his skull

    When he was 6 years old, he mistakenly drank boric acid.

    When he was 9 years old, he fell over a small cliff and broke his leg.

    When he was 11 years old, he contracted measles and was in a coma for nine days.

    When he was 14 years old, he broke his arm when he caught it in a carriage door.

    When he was 19 years old, he was struck on the head by a falling brick.

    When he was 23 years old, he almost died from the effects of tainted wine.

    When he was 29 years old, Adolph Sax invented the saxophone.

    (via gestopft)

    5 days ago  /  298,539 notes  /   /  Source: discordion

  5. photo

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    5 days ago  /  8 notes  /   /  Source: reginasworld

  6. composersdoingnormalshit:

Dmitri Shostakovich looking happy watching soccer.

    composersdoingnormalshit:

    Dmitri Shostakovich looking happy watching soccer.

    (via flamboyant-bassist)

    5 days ago  /  330 notes  /   /  Source: composersdoingnormalshit

  7. composersdoingnormalshit:

Erik Satie having a smoke with Claude Debussy

    composersdoingnormalshit:

    Erik Satie having a smoke with Claude Debussy

    5 days ago  /  377 notes  /   /  Source: composersdoingnormalshit

  8. hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

    hollabackboston:

    roses—and—rue:

    Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

    A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

    When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

    She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

    Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

    Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

    Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

    (via bachtothefugue)

    1 week ago  /  2,735 notes  /   /  Source: roses--and--rue

  9. photo

    photo

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    photo

    1 week ago  /  407,553 notes  /   /  Source: gleekylittleoncer

  10. tedonik:

0rdinarykid:

I forgot to cat

Decided to dog.

    tedonik:

    0rdinarykid:

    I forgot to cat

    Decided to dog.

    (via flamboyant-bassist)

    1 week ago  /  379,050 notes  / 

  11. photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    1 week ago  /  1,653 notes  /   /  Source: BuzzFeed

  12. archdvmon:

Archdvmon

    archdvmon:

    Archdvmon

    (via beautiful-cosmos)

    1 week ago  /  1,283 notes  /   /  Source: archdvmon

  13. The researchers found that that sad music has a counterintuitive appeal – it actually makes people feel better. Sad songs allow listeners to experience indirectly the emotions expressed in the lyrics and implied by the (usually) minor-key melodies. The sadness may not directly reflect the listener’s own experiences, but it triggers chemicals in our brain that can produce a cathartic response: tears, chills, an elevated heartbeat. This is not an unpleasant feeling, and may explain why listeners are inclined to buy sad songs and why artists want to write or sing them.
    – The science of why we love sad songs. Pair with these 7 essential reads on music, emotion, and the brain. (via explore-blog)

    1 week ago  /  2,238 notes  /   /  Source: explore-blog

  14. If there’s a purpose in my life, it’s for me to hear Mozart.

    Maurice Sendak

    Edna St. Vincent Millay put it best.

    Pair with the science of how music enchants the brain.

    (via explore-blog)

    1 week ago  /  238 notes  /   /  Source: explore-blog